Tip

Looking into Visual Studio 2005 and its first Service Pack

What with a new desktop OS (Vista, in all its many versions) and a new version of MS Office (2007) on the scene, there's been plenty of action around Visual Studio in the past few months. Given all the new functionality those two introductions trailed in their wake, not to mention more than a years' worth of updates and fixes since the product first shipped in late 2005, I guess nobody should be surprised that Microsoft has now released multiple versions of a Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1, to roll all this up, along with some other interesting capabilities.

These latter items include:

  • Support for Core Duo processors for code generation and code profiling
  • Improvements in both scaling and performance for the Team Foundation Server that can underlie Visual Studio (especially in the enterprise)
  • Integration of Team Foundation Server with Excel 2007 and Project 2007
  • Tools that provide support for occasionally connected devices as well as SQL Server Compact Edition (both associated with itinerant mobile devices)
  • More and better support for project file-based Web applications
  • Platform and tools support for Windows Embedded 6.0
More on VS 2005 SP 1
Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 now available 

Service Packs available for Visual Studio 2005 Express editions 

Also among these elements you'll find what Microsoft calls its "Visual Studio 2005 SP1 Vista Refresh Beta," an update to SP1 for developers working with Visual Studio 2005 on Vista machines. Now that Vista is on the street, it's just a matter of (a short) time before this beta gets wrapped up, and becomes available as a fully warranted add-on to SP1 for those developers who need it.

You can read more about this Service Pack on the Visual Studio 2005 SP1 Web page, where you'll also find links to the following items in the Microsoft Download Center:

This material is well worth grabbing and digging into. It may require some planning to slipstream the service pack into your organization's development environment, but that's probably a matter of "when" not "if."

Ed Tittel is a writer and trainer whose interests include XML and development topics, along with IT Certification and information security. E-mail etittel@techtarget.com with comments, questions, or suggested topics or tools to review. Cool tools rule!

This was first published in March 2007

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

Disclaimer: Our Tips Exchange is a forum for you to share technical advice and expertise with your peers and to learn from other enterprise IT professionals. TechTarget provides the infrastructure to facilitate this sharing of information. However, we cannot guarantee the accuracy or validity of the material submitted. You agree that your use of the Ask The Expert services and your reliance on any questions, answers, information or other materials received through this Web site is at your own risk.