Definition

HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol)

HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is the set of rules for transferring files (text, graphic images, sound, video, and other multimedia files) on the World Wide Web. As soon as a Web user opens their Web browser, the user is indirectly making use of HTTP. HTTP is an application protocol that runs on top of the TCP/IP suite of protocols (the foundation protocols for the Internet).

HTTP concepts include (as the Hypertext part of the name implies) the idea that files can contain references to other files whose selection will elicit additional transfer requests. Any Web server machine contains, in addition to the Web page files it can serve, an HTTP daemon, a program that is designed to wait for HTTP requests and handle them when they arrive. Your Web browser is an HTTP client, sending requests to server machines. When the browser user enters file requests by either "opening" a Web file (typing in a Uniform Resource Locator or URL) or clicking on a hypertext link, the browser builds an HTTP request and sends it to the Internet Protocol address (IP address) indicated by the URL. The HTTP daemon in the destination server machine receives the request and sends back the requested file or files associated with the request. (A Web page often consists of more than one file.)

The latest version of HTTP is HTTP 1.1.

>> Stay up to date by receiving the latest IT term daily. Simply check "Word of the Day" to register. 

This was last updated in July 2006
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

Email Alerts

Register now to receive SearchWinDevelopment.com-related news, tips and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

More News and Tutorials

  • New certifications will become reality in 2006

    Exams, curricula and processes for Microsoft's revamped certifications will begin to appear in 2006, and the program will expand as Windows Vista, Exchange 12 and Office 12 are released. But IT professionals may be too busy upgrading software to upgrade their own credentials.

  • Another round on the certification treadmill

    Writer Mike Gunderloy reflects on what recently announced changes to Microsoft's certification exams will mean to developers.

  • Microsoft certification program to get a makeover

    Microsoft's introducing sweeping changes to its certification program to make credentials more challenging -- and to reward IT professionals who have extensive on-the-job training.

Do you have something to add to this definition? Let us know.

Send your comments to techterms@whatis.com

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to: